Nomad announced a bounty of up to 10% for the return of the stolen funds from the Nomad bridge. In a website announcement and tweet, the company publicly provided a wallet address for sending the funds.

The bounty is applicable to anyone who comes forward from now on or already returned funds. At the time of writing, Nomad has recovered more than $20 million. 

The Nomad token bridge suffered a massive hack on Tuesday. This incident was among the largest in the history of crypto hacks, with nearly $200 million in crypto assets stolen. However, the platform wasted no time addressing its community and the hackers. 

Update: Nomad Bridge Hack Bounty

(see below for details)

Please send the funds to the official Nomad recovery wallet address on Ethereum: 0x94A84433101A10aEda762968f6995c574D1bF154 https://t.co/8gO1xVl5IC pic.twitter.com/8D7SvbDQlO

— Nomad (⤭⛓) (@nomadxyz_) August 4, 2022

In an official statement, Pranay Mohan, co-founder and CEO of Nomad, commented:

“The most important thing in crypto is community, and our number one goal is restoring bridged user funds.”

In that vein, Nomad will consider any hacker who returns at least 90% of the total hacked funds as a white hat hacker. White hat hackers are sometimes denoted as “ethical hackers.” Though these hackers typically employ the same methods as black hat hackers, they usually have permission from the site owner, which makes their hack legal. White hats are often used to better equip platform security.

Related: $2B in crypto stolen from cross-chain bridges this year: Chainalysis

Though Nomad will consider compliant hackers to be white hat, Mohan also commented that the platform “will continue to work with our partners, intelligence firms, and law enforcement to pursue all other malicious actors to the fullest extent under the law.”

In the days following the hack, Nomad denied any claims of ignoring system bugs that could’ve made room for such a compromise. 

Currently, the platform announced it is working in tandem with TRM Labs and law enforcement to continue tracking down hackers and returning stolen funds.





Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

*

code

On this website we use first or third-party tools that store small files (cookie) on your device. Cookies are normally used to allow the site to run properly (technical cookies), to generate navigation usage reports (statistics cookies) and to suitable advertise our services/products (profiling cookies). We can directly use technical cookies, but you have the right to choose whether or not to enable statistical and profiling cookies. Enabling these cookies, you help us to offer you a better experience.